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Monthly Archives: July 2011

Birthwort

Botanical: Aristolochia longa (LINN.)
Family: N.O. Aristolochiaceae
—Synonym—Long-rooted Birthwort.
—Part Used—The root.
—Habitat—Southern Europe and Japan.

——————————————————————————–
—Description—There are several species of the Aristolochias used by herbalists in India. The root is spindle-shaped from 5 cm. to 3 dm. in length, about 2 cm. in thickness, fleshy, very brittle, greyish externally, brownish-yellow inside, bitter and of a strong disagreeable odour when fresh.
—Constituent—Aristolochine.

—Medicinal Action and Uses—Said to be useful as an aromatic stimulant in rheumatism and gout and for removing obstructions, etc., after childbirth. Dose, 1/2 to 1 drachm of the powdered root.

—Other Species—
Aristolochia, cymbifera from Brazil and Mexico is said to have medicinal properties similar to the official species. Butte affirms it is a depressant to the sensory nerve centres and is useful in neuralgia and pruritis; it was formerly considered alexiteric, antiparalytic, antiperiodic and aphrodisiac.

A. Argentina root is used in that republic as a diuretic and diaphoretic, especially for rheumatism.

A. Indica is used as an emmenagogue, antiarthritic, stomachic, purgative and vermifuge, and in the East Indies is used for similar purposes as the American and European species.

A. Sempervirens is said to be used by the Arabians as a remedy against the poisonous effects of snake-bite.

A. Foetida in Mexico is used as a stimulant to foul ulcers.

A. serpentaria used in bilious, typhoid and typhus fevers, smallpox, pneumonia, amenorrhoea and fevers of a septicaemic type. It is often given in combination with Peruvian Bark, rendering it more active and preventing ill effects on the stomach. It is also used in North America, as are several other varieties of the species, as an alexiteric and for the bites of mad dogs.

Nugua

Themes: Balance, masculinity, femininity, cooperation, equality
Symbols: Yin-Yang Symbol, opposites

About Nugua: In China, Nugua is known as “she who restores
balance.” Nugua’s energy brings life back into equilibrium when
circumstances may have threatened us with chaos. In art she is
depicted as being part rainbow-colored dragon and part woman,
representing the importance of maintaining balance between the lower and
the higher self.

To Do Today: Around this time of year, when the daylight and nighttime
hours are growing closer to equal, the Chinese hold a dragon-boat
festival that revels in Nugua’s balance–the masculine ( yin ) and
feminine ( yang ), the light and the dark, and the cooperative energies
that dance between the two. To commemorate this yourself, be sure to
carry a coin with you ( the heads/tails represents duality ), but keep
it where you won’t accidentally spend it. Bless it, saying,

“By day and dark,
Nugua’s balance impart.”

If negativity threatens your sense of stability, follow Chinese custom
and drum out the evil. Use anything that has a drumlike sound, move
counterclockwise, the direction of banishing, and visualize Nugua’s
rainbow filling every inch of your home.

Offerings of beans, peaches, and rice are also customary. So, either
leave these in a special spot or eat them to internalize any of Nugua’s
attributes you need today.

from 365 Goddess – A Daily Guide of the Magick and Inspiration of the
Goddess
by Patricia Telesco

Goddess Meditation

Let us begin. Let us sing.
Singing of the small corn.
Singing of the large corn.
Singing as the evening falls.
Singing as the light dawns.
The light dawns and finds us singing,
singing as the corn waves tassels at us.
The dark falls and finds us singing,
singing while the squash waves leaves us.
The earth rumbles from the beating
of our basket drums.
The sky rumbles from the beating
of our basket drums.
The rain comes. The rain comes.
~ Pima Rain-Making Song

The plants that feed us need Sun and water and soil in order to thrive.
Too much of one, too little of another, will mean a ruined crop – and,
because we depend upon plants for food, will mean starvation and death
as well. Our forebears knew the necessity of balance between sun and
rain, between night and day, between rest and activity. Too often,
today, the balance is lost, so that newscasters bemoan the rain our
farms and gardens need – and which we, in turn, need as well.

When the weather thwarts our plans this Summer, when weekends are rainy
and evenings damp, let us recognize the rain’s necessity and thank the
goddess for her bounty. The lush green fields, and full larders, will be
our rewards

from The Goddess Companion – Daily Meditations on the Feminine Spirit
by Patricia Monaghan

The Celtic Spirit Meditation

“THE CELTIC SPIRIT” MONDAY, MARCH 08, 2004

DAILY MEDITATIONS FOR THE TURNING YEAR
THE CELTIC SPIRIT
BY:  CAITLIN MATTHEWS

MONDAY, MARCH 08, 2004

THE THREEFOLD

THE SACRED THREE
MY FORTRESS BE,
ENCIRCLING ME.
COME AND BE ROUND
MY HEARTH, MY HOME
BY:  ALISTAIR MACLEAN, HEBRIDEAN ALTARS

The reverence for the threefold is deeply engrained in Celtic culture.  This
threefold conjunction is implicit within the creative process of beginning,
middle, and end; in the three sacred seeds of wisdom that flash out of the
cauldron of knowledge as primal sparks of inspiration; in the human family
as
mother, father, and child; in the apparent world as sea, land, and sky.
Each of these threefolds offers an essential understanding of the nature of
life itself and is recognized and revered as one of the supreme supports of
the cosmos.

Ancient Celtic wisdom was encapsulated in triads, tersely gnomic renditions
of precedents, proverbs, historical incidents, and knowledge that could be
remembered by everyone.  (Many triads are scattered throughout this book.)
Triple-headed gods and threefold coteries of goddesses are also common in
Celtic religion:  a triplicity that is reflected in the Trinity–a concept
thought by some scholars to have been developed by the Celtic St. Hiliary of
Tours in the fourth century.

Today the ancient respect for three has become part of our concept of luck:
“The third time’s lucky,” we say.  Or, if we have had two unfortunate
happenings, we may wonder what the third misfortune is likely to be.  Three
is the number that comprises creation, destruction, and maintenance of life.
For all these reasons, the Celts could not revere a greater or more
encompassing number than three.

WHAT ARE THE THREE SOURCES OR SUPPORTS OF YOUR LIFE–THOSE PEOPLE, THINGS,
OR
PLACES WITHOUT WHICH IT WOULD HAVE NO MEANING?

LAVENDER POTPOURRI

8 oz. lavender flowers 4 oz. dried rose petals
1 tb. crushed cinnamon 1 ½ tsp. crushed cloves
1 tb. gum benzoin 6 drops of lavender eo
2 drops of rose eo 2 drops of bergamot eo
2 drops of ylang ylang eo 2 drops of sandalwood eo
1 tsp. powdered vanilla bean 1 tsp. powdered orris root

Cheese-Bread Stars

Here’s a recipe to take to your next Wic-Nic (Wiccan Picnic), Merry Meet and Greet, or Pagan Gathering.

Heat your oven to 375 degrees. Cut Italian bread into 12 slices, about half an inch thick each. Cut each slice with a 3-inch cookie cutter in the shape of a star (you can use other cutter designs, too, but for the moment, I’m stuck on stars!).

Place the bread stars on a cookie sheet, ungreased, and spread 1 teaspoon of pesto on each slice.

Next, use a smaller (say, 2 inch?) star-shaped cookie cutter to cut sliced American or cheddar cheese. Place these smaller cheese stars on the larger bread stars, with the pesto between. Bake for about 8 minutes or until the cheese melts. Serves a dozen celestial thinkers. Yum!

 

From Gifts for the Goddess on a Cold Winter’s Eve

C2001 by Lorna Tedder and Shannon Bailey

Morning Blessing

Shortly after rising, light a white candle and say this blessing or the alternative one on the next page.

“I call upon you, sisters three,
You who sit beneath life’s tree.
Bless and watch over me this day,
These things of you, I ask and pray.
Mighty Clothos, you who spin,
The thread and yarn of life on whim.
Grant my thread be soft, yet strong,
And the essence of my own life’s song.
Mighty Lachesis, you who weave,
And measure the cloth of life with ease.
Weave my life beautifully,
With colour and texture for all to see.
Mighty Atropos, you who slice,
Life’s fabric and thread with a snip precise.
Grant me now another day,
To return to thank you – this I pray.
Mighty ones, oh sisters three,
You who sit beneath the tree.
For each day I awaken to,
Accept the thanks I offer you”

Acne Astringent

Acne Astringent  Stephanie Tourles – The Herbal Body Book

1 T yarrow

1 T calendula or chamomile

2 c distilled water

15 drops tincture of benzoin

6 drops peppermint e.o.

Boil water & remove from heat.  Add herbs. Cover & steep 30 minutes.  Strain. Add tincture of benzoin and peppermint e.o.. Store.  Use 1 t per application. Refrigerate.

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