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Monthly Archives: April 2013

Teaching Meditation to Children

By Sarah Wood

Indigo Children: Teaching Meditation to Children

By Sarah wood Orignially printed in Children of the New Earth
on-line magazine

Most people are curious about a child's ability to meditate.
Many adults can't seem to find the time nor have the patience,
so people wonder how could a child sit still long enough to meditate?
 Remarkably, children love to meditate. Meditation allows children
 to use their creative imagination without limitation.
As a former schoolteacher and certified hypnotherapist,
I've been working with children since 1991 and currently
teach meditation techniques to children.

I've had the wonderful opportunity to work with children who are
creative, intuitive,
physically and emotionally sensitive and nonconforming.
Many of these children, also called Indigo Children,
have been diagnosed with ADD, ADHD and bipolar disorder
and are brought to me by parents who are looking for a
drug-free solution.
In most cases these labels are neither necessary nor helpful.
If a child associates herself with words such as disorder and deficit,
her self-confidence is affected and she may believe she will be
defined by these terms for the rest of her life.
However ignoring her symptoms is not the answer either.
A child who is very energetic and has trouble focusing,
is usually frustrated
and unhappy and will benefit from alternative therapies.

Meditation has proven effective with helping children
become more attentive, which begins with a child's
ability to focus on himself.
Meditation is a time for children to explore their inner world.
Children are fascinated with clouds in the sky and stories on television;
 however, they are most captivated by their own thoughts.

Many adults have trouble opening their inner mind to see the visual
 images useful in meditation. Children, on the other hand, are by nature visual and easily hold and explore their inner images. Having taught both adults and children how to meditate, I have found children to be the better students.

The facilitator of the child's experience determines the success
 his meditation. Anyone can become a dynamic child meditation
 facilitator, whether they are a parent, teacher or therapist.
 The facilitator should be familiar with the most important
 benefits a child attains through meditation, practice and awareness.
 When a child meditates,
he practices something in his head so later it is easier for him
 to carry out the particular action or feeling.
Meditation also brings into consciousness thoughts the child is
unaware of during normal consciousness.

Practice: something we do so we feel better later
When we practice a process in our minds, we are able to
successfully repeat this process in the real world.
Simply stated, we do something in our heads so we feel better later.
 This is similar to working out our body at the gym.
We strengthen our biceps so we are able to lift a heavy box later.
 Likewise, during meditation Ashley practices how to let go of the angry
 energy in her body in a meditation.
Then after meditating it is easier for her to let go of her anger
 when confronted with a conflict.

The most ideal practice meditations bring calmness and focus to a child .
These meditations are quite grounding,
that is they bring a child into balance with the natural rhythms
of the earth, which results in physical stability and emotional ease.
A child can practice these meditations absolutely anywhere,
even in her classroom when she begins to feel distracted or frustrated.
 
For example, the Sleepy Cloud meditation helps a restless child
 bring sleepy thoughts into her inner mind, allowing her to fall asleep .
The Flower meditation teaches children how to open up like a flower,
allowing them to let go of specific fears and welcome new experiences.

Awareness: Seeing thoughts hidden deep down inside our minds
Meditation is also useful for bringing into consciousness
 a subconscious thought.
For example, Keith practices a release meditation during which a
picture of a frightening movie scene appears in his mind.
When he shares this, the facilitator learns that this scene may
be causing a fear he has been expressing recently.
This awareness prompts a conversation about the scene,
and coupled with more meditation brings peace to the child.

An effective awareness meditation is the Time Machine.
Children are able to travel through time to the future,
giving the facilitator an indication of how the child
views his own future and the future of the world.
Another example is the Tree meditation,
during which the child sees a tree with happy and sad fruit.
He nurtures his sad fruit in a special way; and consequently,
both the child and facilitator better understand what actions
need to be taken to help him out of his own sadness.

Getting Started
Meditation is a relatively big word for most children.
This word is sometimes a foreign concept to adults and
therefore can be intimidating to the facilitator.
However, it is a big word for something very simple!
Moreover, there is no right or wrong answer for what meditation means.
I define it as sitting very still,
usually with our eyes closed and thinking about something on purpose,
 as opposed to daydreaming.

Before beginning a meditation, ask the child to close her eyes and think
about what her bedroom looks like.
When she opens her eyes ask her,
If your eyes were closed when you saw the picture of your bedroom,
then how did you see the picture? Performing this short exercise
and participating in a discussion about it should alleviate any
fears associated with not being able to meditate.

Next, explain to the child how people usually position their body
during meditation. Then let her know any position is perfect as
long as she is comfortable. She can meditate sitting up in a chair,
lying down, or sitting cross-legged on the floor. Let her know it is best if her eyes are closed, and it might be easier if she puts her hands over her eyes to help keep them closed. Remind the child that she can meditate anywhere. In fact she can meditate for a few minutes in her school classroom without anyone knowing what she is doing. She can even meditate with her eyes open if she prefers.

The following meditation allows a child to connect with his
male and female energies; however, I refer to the female energy
as the Listener and the male energy as the Doer.
After facilitating the short exercise above and
before beginning the Listener-Doer meditation,
discuss the many different parts of ourselves:
the part that likes to have fun, the part that likes to be sad,
the part that likes to be loud, and the part that likes to be quiet.

The Listener-Doer meditation introduces the child to the part of
himself that likes to listen. Not necessarily the aspect
who listens to Mom and Dad, but the part who listens to himself.
To better demonstrate this concept, place an object in front of the child.
A stuffed animal or a plant is an excellent choice,
as long as it is something he is likely to communicate with.
Ask him to close his eyes and ask the stuffed animal a question.
How does Teddy feel today? When he has heard a response talk
about what he heard so he understands what is meant by listening.

This meditation also acquaints the child with the part of
himself who likes to do things, such as walking, talking, yelling,
and hugging. The Listener-Doer meditation encourages a quiet timid
child to become more confident to act on his inner voice and helps
a very active child to listen to his inner voice as opposed to
acting unconsciously.

The Meditation
Take the child through this fascinating journey.
Close your eyes. You can put your hands over your eyes,
if you want to. Take in a deep breath. Now when you breathe back out,
feel your body relaxing. We'll take two more breaths.
Deep breath in, and relax your legs as you breath out.
Deep breath in. Relax your arms and neck as you breathe out.

I would like you to imagine yourself in one of your favorite places.
It doesn't matter where you are, just as long as you like being there.
 I want you to see the Listener part of yourself playing with you.
You might see this part of yourself as an animal or a special character

 or your Listener might look just like you, like a twin .
While you are there with the Listener, ask him or her what it
needs to be happy. (Pause) What did your Listener say to you?
Is there anything you want to tell your Listener?

Now I want you to see the Doer part of yourself playing with you
and the Listener. Your Doer might be an animal, or a special character,
or might look just like you. While you are there with the Doer,
ask him or her what it needs to be happy.
 (Pause) What did the Doer say?
Is there anything you want to tell the Doer?

Your Listener and Doer have presents for you.
See the Listener give you a present.
If it is wrapped up, unwrap it and see what they gave you. See the Doer give you a present. If it is wrapped up, unwrap it and see what they gave you. Give your Listener and Doer a great big hug and thank them for being with you today in your meditation.

When you are done talking to your Listener and Doer,
go ahead and open your eyes.

Follow-up Activities
Discussing what the child experienced during the
meditation is as important as the meditation itself.
After the meditation, ask the child one or more of
the following questions and assist her to understand
what her meditation symbolized. What did your Listener
say it needed to be happy? What did your Doer say it needed to be happy?
What presents did they give you?
Do you know why they gave those presents to you?

Art, writing and music are effective ways for a child
to integrate a meditation into her world.
Working on an art project allows the child to
hold the memory of the meditation in her consciousness
for additional time while she reflects on her experience.
Additional ah-ha's can be discovered during this process.
Writing and music activities bring about the same positive results.

For a follow-up art project for the Listener-Doer meditation,
have the child make puppets of her Listener and Doer
and encourage her to use the puppets to continue to
communicate with her Listener and Doer.
These can be made out of paper lunch bags or socks.
She can glue items on to her sock puppets or draw and
color on the paper bags. Keep in mind, art projects
can be as simple as drawing a picture of something she
experienced during her meditation.
Author: Sarah Wood www.sarahwood.com
Former school teacher and hypnotherapist explains
how the whole family benefits from teaching children
simple meditation techniques.
Meditation is an adventure any child will love.
For more information, please visit http://www.indigonetwork.org

Aromatherapy Magick

 

Here’s a brief guide to essential oils (EO’s) and their aromatherapy uses.

EOs reputed to aid memory and recall: Cedarwood, Marjoram, Peppermint, Rosemary

EOs reputed to aid relaxation: Chamomile, Clary Sage, Juniper Berry, Lavander, Lemon, Mandarin, Marjoram, Neroli, Rose, Rose Geranium, Sandalwood, Ylang Ylang.

EOs reputed to aid alertness: Black Pepper, Juniper Berry, Lemon, Peppermint, Pine, Rosemary, Rose Geranium, Ylang Ylang.

…OK, you may be wondering, how can an essential oil (such as ylang ylang) help relax you AND keep you alert? Ylang Ylang and Juniper Berry are among the EOs that have a general balancing effect on the body and mind…

EOs reputed to aid depression: Chamomile, Clary Sage, Eucalyptus, Juniper Berry, Lavender, Petitgrain, Rosemary, Sandalwood.

EOs reputed to aid congestion: Eucalyptus, Lavender, Lemon, Patchouli, Peppermint, Pine, Rosemary.

EOs reputed to have pain-relieving properties: Cajeput, Chamomile, Ginger, Helichrysum, Lavender, Marjoram, Rosemary, Rose.

EOs reputed to have skin-rejuvenation effects on mature skin: Carrot Seed, Frankincense, Lavender, Jasmine, Myrrh, Neroli, Palmarosa, Patchouli, Rose.

Some delightfully spicy essential oils are skin irritants, even when used diluted. These can even burn your skin, so please use caution with these oils and dilute them well in a good carrier oil: Allspice, Birch, Camphor, Cinnamon, Clove, Oregano, Savory, Thuja, Thyme, Turmeric, Wintergreen.

These are potentially toxic oils. They have limited uses in perfumery, and some people use them to create pesticides. But my advice is “don’t try this at home!”: Arnica, Bitter Almond, Calamus, Hyssop, Mugwort, Mustard, Pennyroyal, Sassafras.

WARNING! WARNING! WARNING! WARNING! WARNING! These ARE toxic essential oils, far too strong for use by the hobbyist. General aromatherapy use of these oils may result in kidney and/or liver failure. When these oils enter your system, the breakdown which occurs creates toxic molecules which bind to the cells of the liver and kidneys, destroying them. This is serious, and too scary! Pharmaceutical companies may know how to use these oils to control certain human body functions, but I recommend that anyone else STAY AWAY: Horseradish, Jaborandi, Narcissus, Parsley, Santolina, Rue, Tansy, Tonka Bean, Wormwood. (Synthetic fragrance oils, such as narcissus, don’t actually contain any narcissus and probably won’t hurt you, unless you have allergies.)

Again, pregnant women need to exercise caution, don’t use ESSENTIAL OILS AT ALL,  better safe than sorry. The jury is still out on the impact of essential oils on a developing fetus. Sniffing the wonderful aromas of most essential oils won’t hurt, and may in fact help keep a pregnant woman’s emotions balanced, but direct application of any essential oil to the skin probably should be avoided. Lavender, chamomile, rose, geranium, sandalwood and some citruses (orange, grapefruit) are the safest known essential oils and are probably OK, but please check with your doctor. The essential oils mentioned above are also fine for young children.

Getting Started
Some of you have asked how to get started using essential oils. Which oils should you have on hand? Well,there are many essential oils to choose from, over 100 are readily available. You do not have to purchase all of them to get started. I suggest you start with a bascic kit thatr contains some of the more common oils then add some of your favorites. Purchase small quantities and experiment with blending different oils together. Purchase one or two good books on aromatherpy to guide you. Take a class. Many are offered at health food stores, adult education classes and aromatherapy boutiques. Some of the oils to have on hand are:
 
Lavender::known to be calming, used for insomnia.General first aid, burns, bites. Use in baths (wonderful), massage, perfumes, inhalation.
 
Tea Tree: Antibacterial, Antiviral and Antifungal use for Cuts, bites,dandruff, atheletes foot. A first aid must. A drop may be used neat.
 
Eucalyptus: A must have for this time of year. Diffuse daily to kill cold germs in the air. Use for colds, sinus congestion, Use in diffuser, inhalation and massage peppermint: Aids headaches, a digestive aid, pain killer, travel sickness. Use in massage, compress, diffuser, inhalant.
 
Orange: Think happy! Another basic. Calming, yet uplifting, blends well with the other cotrus oils and Lavender.
 
Lemon: Great for cleaning. Fights germs and bacteria.Another refreshing citrus scent.Helps concentration.
 
Peppermint: Energizes, great when driving a long trip. Reduces nausea and headache. Improves digestion.

ALL ABOUT ESSENTIAL OILS

Essential oils are the natural substance extracted and distilled from aromatic plants. These oils have the power to heal, containing antibiotic, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory properties, effective to both our bodies, our minds, and our emotions.

Essential oils have to be combined with a “carrier” oil, and not used directly on the skin. When blended together, they can be applied directly to the skin or diffused through the air. Essential oils travel through the entire body and can be used to “treat” or “affect” different systems within our bodies.

When diffused through the air, essential oils affect our moods, emotions, and energy or anxiety levels. They can contribute to our overall well being. Also be sure to use pure essential oils and avoid “aromatherapy grade” (translated as synthetic) oils. Other than to smell pleasant, they have no therapeutic properties.

MEDICINAL USES FOR THERAPEUTIC OILS

I have included some basic information on some of the more commonly used oils and how they might be beneficial in your life. Please don’t forget that this information is not meant to replace medical advice or treatment from your health care professional. I hope that you enjoy this information, and encourage to research and learn more about this valuable subject. Namaste….Dusty

Aromatherapy is the use of essential oils as a ‘holistic’ treatment, balancing and harmonizing your body, mind and soul. Essential oils (sometimes referred to as ‘Medicines of the Earth’) are stored in tiny sacs between cells that carry the plants life force, or immune system. Essential Oils are extracted from different parts of flowers, fruits, barks, roots and leaves. They are derived from many different methods of extraction and the type of extraction depends on the type of plant the oil is being extracted from.

Essential oils regulate the plants functions, they are the carriers of the plants energy – they protect the plant from heat, cold, fungus, insects and assist plants in the fertilization or pollination process. Essential Oils are also considered the plants hormone system, which tends to mimic or own endocrine (hormone) system.

Society is beginning to understand that illnesses may originate in the mind and the ‘holistic’ approach may be necessary for healing both mind and body. Essential Oils act as a ‘biotic’ in a non-evasive manner, building and mobilizing your body’s own healing powers as opposed to a synthetic ‘antibiotic’ which adds further stress and trauma to living tissue, eventually causing allergies and side effects. Naturally, essential oils have a small number of constituents and trace elements. These trace elements have a synergistic effect on the other elements. Only those ‘exact’ elements give Essential Oils their therapeutic quality. The synthetic industry desperately tries to reconstruct these complex combinations of components which is virtually impossible. They also lack the ‘vital’ live force in it’s natural origin. There is a type of photography called ‘Carillon – in which you can see the energy fields that surround living organisms. Aromatherapy is a valuable complimentary treatment to current mainstream medicines. A photo of a freshly cut leaf, shows a distinct colorful aura. As time passes and the leaf dies, that aura disappears. Photographs of high quality essential oils show a strong visible aura.

Essential Oils affect our physiological well being and regulate physical imbalances. They also remove ‘toxins’ on which illness flourishes. Essential Oils invite us to appreciate mother nature. Our physical well being depends on us being totally well. We are intended to be in touch with nature and living in the city with all the pollution and concrete, makes it hard for us to do this. Essential oils allow us that luxury. The practice of aromatherapy includes many different forms. Proceed to the next page to start finding out about those forms.

HOW ESSENTIAL OILS WORK

Olfactory System

Our sense of smell is our most enduring and powerful of all our senses. It is linked with emotions which are stored in our limbic brain. Our memory of scent is longer lasting and more accurate than our sight or reasoning memory. Scent triggers our emotions affecting the autonomic system (controls nerves leading to your body’s glands and organs). Stress level, heart rate, respiratory and digestive systems are all influenced by our emotional state. Essential Oils fragrant molecules travel to the brain through the breathing process – having the ability to affect the brain immediately through the olfactory system. This is the only place on the body where the central nervous system is directly exposed to the environment. Our other nerves or senses must travel through our sensory path of neurons and spinal cord before reaching the brain. The oldfactory bulb is lined on both sides with a special tissue consisting of approximately ten million nerve cells covered with a thin layer of mucous. These nerve cells are replaced every twenty eight days. Each nerve cell has six to eight tiny hairs acting as receptors by electrical impulse to the oldfactory membrane (actual brain cells)

Topical
Essential Oils absorbed topically (through the skins pores) reach the bloodstream through connective and lymphatic tissues. This happens in approximately 10-20 minutes. Essential Oils have a minute molecular structure and the capability to penetrate the subcuteous or (fat) layer allowing easy penetration of the skin.

Caution
Caution must be taken when ingesting the oils and in early pregnancy. Only under the experience of a trained therapist are these methods to be recommended. When essential oils are taken internally they are least effective because they have to travel through gastric juices before reaching the specified organ needing treatment.

METHODS OF EXTRACTION

Essential oils are extracted from various different parts of flowers, fruits, bark, roots and leaves. There are many different methods of extraction and the type of extraction depends on the type of plant the oil is being extracted from. Here are some of the more widely used methods.

Distillation
Small pieces of plant material are put into the container in the still. The Water below the container is heated to create steam and carries the oils extracted through the tube to the cold water – which carries it to the receptacle. The receptacle is filled with water and essential oils (essential oils are lighter than water) float to the top of the receptacle. Stainless steel stills are preferred to metal as some essential oils will cause metal to corrode.

Cold Press (Expression)
Citrus fruit has small (very visible) oil glands deposited in the skin of the fruit. The skin of the fruit is shredded, mixed with water, and extracted by pressure. No heat is used in this process as this would destroy volatile and important substances (as does overcooking vegetables.) It is very important that fruit used by this procees be of organically grown origin(ie. no pesticides).

Enfleurage – (Pornades)
Freshly cut plant material (such as jasmine) is immersed in a neutral fat or oil and spread on sheets of glass. This process is repeated for weeks and eventually the fat becomes saturated with the volatile oils and then alcohol is used to separate the essential oils from the fat.

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Method
This method is a fairly recent discovery. CO2 or butane, when liquified under pressure, extracts essential oils from plants. Essential oils distilled in this manner allow the plants volatile components to remain. Aromatherapists are still studying the properties of essential oils are extracted by this method.

Upon extraction, essential oils fall into three of the following categories:

Concrete
Extracted by hydro-carbon (petroleum) type solvent from raw or live tissues of the vegetable family. Usually solid and have a waxy non-crystalized consistency. This method of extraction is used when heat takes away the ‘nutrients’ or goodness of certain plants (bark, flower, herb, root) Concretes contain 50% wax and 50% oil therefore being more stable and concentrated.

Absolute
Extracted from Concrete by a second process using pure alcohol. Not recommended for thereputic work because of the remaining impurities from the alcohol (2% or less). The texture is highly concentrated liquid. In rare cases solid or semi-solid (clary sage).

Resinoid
Extracted from hydrocarbon solvent from dead organic material. Typical resinoids (amber), oleoresins (turpentine) and oleo gun resins (frankinsense and myrhh).

Various textures
Liquid, semi-liquid or solid. Is a good fixative to prolong the scent of a fragrance

Origin of Essential Oils

Essential oils are meant to be harvested in the country where Mother Nature intended them to grow. Aromatherapy is part of a multi billion dollar industry and farmers and wholesalers are trying to grow crops of plants where they are not intended to grow. Plants have their optimum healing properties when grown and harvested in the optimal growing and climatic regions. It is also important that the oils are grown botanically or wildcrafted without pesticides and fertilizers.

Price
Basically – you get what you pay for. There are different qualities of essential oils, just as there are different quality tomatoes, there will also be some price fluctuation, depending on the harvest conditions. It also depends on the amount of Essential Oils a plant produces: It takes 160 lbs of Lavendar to make 1 lb of Esssential Oil, it takes 1000 lbs of Jasmine to make 1lb of Essential Oil, etc. Some companies have re-labeling and high overhead costs which are projected in their oils. Some Essential Oils are also diluted (make sure the carrier is botanical). Become a label reader and ask your seller for all of this information. There are some tests a consumer can do to test the purity of the oils. Essential oils are not an ‘oil’ in the true sense of the word. Unlike fatty oils they are volatile and evaporate without a trace (except maybe a bit of color) when dropped on a piece of tissue or white silk, leaving no oily residue. The nose knows, trust it !!!

Packaging:
Essential Oils should be kept in dark containers and should not be exposed directly to light or drastic tempuratures – this can diminish the volatile properties of the oils. All of the PURE Aromatherapy blends are confined to the strict standards we have set for ourselves. As you can see by the photo, our oils are stored and shipped directly to you in dark glass containers which prevent contamination from UVA and UVB sources.

Shelf Life
Essential oils are fresh botanicals and should be treated as such. They are at their optimum for healing power within the first few years. Citrus fruits are more sensitive and should be used as soon as possible. Some essential oils like, jasmine, rose, patchould, sandalwood, ripen over the years, much like a good wine.
Finally, a word on safety. Most essential oils are safe to use in minimal doses. Your body tends to take what it needs from the essential oils and dispense of what it does not need through various organ elimination (lungs,skin (sweat), and excretion (urine, bowels).

SUGGESTED USES/APPLICATIONS FOR ESSENTIAL OILS

BATH

Bathing with essential oils is a delightful experience for the body, mind and soul. It is one of the most effective ways to benefit from Aromatherapy. In warm water, essential oils are readily absorbed into the body tissues and the aromatic vapors effortlessly inhaled. This benefits the ‘entire’ body/mind system. After the tub is filled, add 5-10 drops of your specifically chosen essential oil/blend to water. Breath deeply, relax and let all your worries decimate into the water. For dry, sensitive skin add essential oil(s) to a carrier oil (jojoba, grapeseed, etc….)

MASSAGE

Essential oils can produce incredible results when used in massage. They have the ability to penetrate deeply into the skin tissues and then are circulated throughout the entire mind/body system. Inhaling the aromatic vapors also have an immediate effect upon the mind and emotions. Massages are therapeutically beneficial for internal problems, stress, anxiety, depression, lymphatic drainage, weight loss, detoxification, circulation, easing pain, and sore muscles. Custom blend essential oils for your massage to your specific needs.

SKIN CARE

Essential oils easily penetrate into the underlying layers of the skin (dermas), promoting regeneration and rejuvenation of the skin cells. They can be purchased pre-blended (make sure you read your ingredient listings – look out for mineral oil, it is natural, but clogs pores) essential oils can also be added to facial cleansers, toners, creams and lotions you may purchase unscented skin care and add 10-15 drops of essential oil to 1 ounce of liquid. Do not apply essential oils directly to skin without the advice of an aromatherapist. Essential oils have incredibly rejuvenating and moisturizing effects on your skin, also beneficial when inhaling essential oils during your daily skin care regime.

HAIR CARE

Essential oils ‘vastly’ improve the health of your hair and scalp, strengthening and stimulating the hair follicles, enhancing growth, and regulating oil secretion. For dry damaged hair, mix 10-15 drops per 1 ounce of jojoba and massage into scalp and comb through hair ( can leave on for thirty minutes, then shampoo). Essential oils can moisturize, eliminate dandruff, and add shine to your hair. Essential oils can be added to your s hair to eliminate frizz may also be added to a ‘hot oil’ treatment.

INHALATION

The easiest way to enjoy the benefits of essential oils is to inhale their aromatic fragrance directly. Try a few drops on a tissue, or a few drops on your pillow at night, wonderful for the respiratory system when inhaled through steam vaporization.

DIFFUSION

Also known as environmental fragrancing, used in Aromatherapy diffusers, spray/body mists, air fresheners. There are a variety of ways to disperse essential oils directly into the air. This is a very beneficial way to refresh the air, kill airborne bacteria, promotes physical and well being, creates various moods in your home, car or work place, can also protect your aura from negative energies.

*NOTE*

Essential oils are highly concentrated and should be used with extreme respect and care. Never take essential oils internally or during pregnancy without the advice of your aromatherapist. This reference chart is not intended to treat, diagnose or prescribe.

HISTORY:
Aromatherapy has been used for thousands of years by many different cultures. The first written list of herbs was compiled approximately 3,000 years ago by the Chinese. Ancient cultures of the Egyptian, Greek, and Roman writings show the use of various plants and flowers to cure ailments. Considered a alternate branch of the healing arts, aromatherapy has seen a great increase in interest around the world. Stores commonly sell scented objects such as lotions, candles, incense, and event scented pillows! There are even more new aromatherapy products being created. It is important to understand that the practice of aromatherapy is very individual. You may like one scent and hate another. It is important to experiment and try different scents and even combinations of scents to find what you really enjoy.

Please read the following warnings about essential oils:
Oils which ARE NOT SUITABLE FOR HOME USE include, but are not restricted to: cinnamon, clove, hyssop, and sage.
Oils which SHOULD NOT BE USED DURING PREGNANCY include, but are not restricted to: basil, clove, cinnamon, fennel, hyssop, juniper, marjoram, myrrh, peppermint, rosemary, sage, and white thyme.
Oils which SHOULD NOT BE USED FOR STEAM FACIALS include, but are not restricted to: bay, clary sage, ginger, juniper, pine, and tea tree.
Oils which are PHOTOSYNTHESIZING include, but are not restricted to: lemon, bergamot, lime, and orange. Do not go out into the sun for at least two hours after applying these oils to your skin.

BATH:

Adding essential oils to a bath makes the experience even more relaxing, or invigorating, than usual. Add about five drops of your favorite oil to your bathtub, or try one of the recipes listed here (after it has filled), stir the water, and soak for at least fifteen minutes. As a general rule, do not to exceed ten drops of total essential oils per bath, and try to keep it around five for maximum effectiveness. Please read all the warnings at the bottom before using.

Balancing Bath: 2 d. rose oil * 2 d. neroli oil * 2 d. geranium oil. Cleansing Bath: 3 d. geranium oil * 3 d. lemon oil * 2 d. petitgrain oil. Cold/ Flu Bath: 5 d. eucalyptus * 5 d. peppermint * 4 d. lavender. Add 7 d. thyme for chest congestion.
 
Concentrating Bath: 4 d. violet oil * 2 d. rose oil * 2 d. ylang ylang oil. Eases tension and returns concentration.
 
Extra-Relaxing Bath: 10 d. lavender * 5 d. marjoram. To be used only right before bed.
 
Feminine Bath: 4 d. ylang ylang * 4 d. petitgrain. Tension reliever, preferred by women.
 
Hot Summer’s Day Bath: 3 d. juniper oil * 3 d. patchouli oil. Best effective in a cool bath.
 
Insomnia Bath: 4 d. chamomile oil * 2 d. lavender oil * 4 d. neroli oil * 2 d. marjoram oil.
 
Invigorating Bath: 3 d. bergamot oil * 3 d. petitgrain oil * 2 d. lemon oil. This bath is helpful for winter dullness.
 
Jet-Lag Bath: 3 d. rosemary oil * 2 d. lemon oil * 2 d. frankincense oil.
 
Masculine Bath: 2 d. bay oil * 2 d. cedarwood oil * 2 d. lemon oil. Can be applied to the skin before showering, diluted in oil.
 
Men’s Relaxing Bath: 3 d. pine oil * 2 d. chamomile oil * 2 d. lemon oil.
 
Mental Confusion Bath I: 6 d. melissa * 4 d. bergamot * 6 d. lemon * 2 d. lemongrass * 2 d. lavender.
 
Mental Confusion Bath II: 4 d. rosewood * 4 d. patchouli.
 
Muscle Ache Bath: 2 d. ginger oil * 3 d. eucalyptus oil * 4 d. rosemary oil. Relieves muscle cramping and pain.
 
No-More-Nervousness Bath: 6 d. geranium oil * 2 d. basil oil * 2 d. neroli oil.
 
Pain-Relieving Bath: 2 d. geranium oil * 3 d. cypress oil * 2 d. lavender oil. Especially effective for relieving period cramps.
 
PMS Bath: 3 d. lavender oil * 3 d. clary sage oil.
 
Relaxing Bath: 2 d. lavender oil * 2 d. bergamot oil * 2 d. cedarwood oil.
 
Relaxing Bath II: 2 d. bergamot oil * 4 d. patchouli oil * 6 d. frankincense oil.
 
Reviving Bath: 2 d. orange oil * 2 d. frankincense oil * 2 d. geranium oil.
 
Sensuous Bath I: 3 d. jasmine oil * 3 d. sandalwood oil * 3 d. ylang ylang oil. An intimate bath, more feminine than masculine.
 
Sensuous Bath II: 3 d. cedarwood oil * 2 d. frankincense oil * 2 d. lime oil. Stress-relieving as well as sensuous.
 
Shock-Reducing Bath: 4 d. cypress * 2 d. cedarwood * 2 d. sandalwood.
 
Soothing Bath: 2 d. galbanum oil * 2 d. geranium oil * 2 d. lavender oil. Relieves anxiety and frustration.
 
Summer Bath: 3 d. lemon oil * 3 d. rosemary oil * 3 d. peppermint oil. Most effective in a cool or lukewarm bath.
 
Tranquilizing Before-Bed Bath: 2 d. neroli oil * 2 d. rose oil * 2 d. lavender oil * 2 d. ylang ylang oil. Flowery; good after a stressful day.
 
Water Retention Bath: 6 d. geranium oil * 6 d. juniper oil * 6 d. cypress oil.
 
Welcome the Weekend Bath:2 d. geranium oil * 2 d. neroli oil * 5 d. lavender oil.

FACE CARE:
Essential oils can be used to treat blemishes or acne, or can be used in face masks or washes to balance and tone healthy skin. As a general rule, do not to exceed ten drops of total essential oils per ointment, and try to keep it around five for maximum effectiveness. Please read all the warnings at the bottom before using.

Acne Medication: 8 d. tea tree * 6 d. bergamot * 4 d. lavender: in .75 oz of jojoba oil. Apply to face every evening, massaging around, not on, the pimple. Mix recipe with cream for daytime use (do not go into sun while using). Add a few drops of carrot oil to the mixture after sking has cleared to reduce spotting from previous breakouts.
 
Dry Skin Wash: 10 d. sandalwood oil * 10 d. bois de rose oil * 10 d. lavender oil: in 2 tablespoons of avocado.
 
Hair Treatment: 2 d. rosemary oil * 1 d. lavender oil * 1 d. bay oil: in 20 ml olive oil. Use as a scalp massage, or apply to hair, cover for half an hour, and shampoo as usual.
 
Problem Skin Wash: 10 d. myrrh oil * 10 d. palmarosa oil * 10 d frankincense oil: in 1 tablespoon of Borage and 1 tablespoon of flaxseed.
 
Reviving Face Mask: 2 d. petitgrain oil * 2 d. lemon oil * 2 d. ylang ylang oil: in 20 ml of iced water. Mix with enough crushed almonds to make a paste. Apply as a face mask. Let dry, then rinse off.
 
Suncare Blend: 14 d. lavender oil * 1 d. peppermint oil: in 4-8 oz. of cold water. Use in an atomizer on sunny days, spritzing yourself as needed.

FOOT CARE:

Your feet are the most abused part of your body. Especially for people who spend a good deal of their time at work on their feet, in jobs like waitressing or as a cashier, feet can become extremely sore and worn out. These recipes, coupled with massage of the foot, will restore your tired dogs to their fromer glory. As a general rule, do not to exceed ten drops of total essential oils per ointment, and try to keep it around five for maximum effectiveness. Please read all the warnings at the bottom before using.

Aching Feet Massage: 2 d. chamomile oil * 2 d. eucalyptus oil: in 20 ml. of carrier oil. Use sweeping strokes and gentle circular pressing motion for optimal results.
 
Corn and Verucca Foot Massage: 2 d. lemon oil * 3 d. tea tree oil: in 20 ml of carrier oil. Use over a period of time, rather than for one night only.
 
Soothing Foot Massage: 4 d. lavender oil * 3 d. rosemary oil: in 20 ml. of carrier oil. Relaxes feet and refreshes fatigue.
 
Stimulating Foot Bath: 2 d. bay oil * 2 d. ginger oil: in a large bowl of hot water. Soak feet in mixture for ten minutes.
 
Theraputic Footbath: 4 d. lemongrass oil * 4 d. lavender oil: in a large bowl of hot water. Can also be used to control excessive persperation on the hands or feet.

MASSAGE RECIPES:
Perhaps the most popular way to use essential oils, massage combines the healing art of aromatherapy with the healing art of touch. Self-massage is just as effective as being massaged by another person, and lack of a partner is no excuse for not trying these relaxing recipes. Always use essential oils diluted in a carrier oil- never place them directly onto the skin. As a general rule, do not to exceed ten drops of total essential oils per mixture, and try to keep it around five for maximum effectiveness. Please read all the warnings at the bottom before using.

All -Purpose Face and Neck Massage: 3 d. violet oil * 2 d. rose oil: in 20 ml of carrier oil. Add vitamin E for extra richness.
 
Anti-Tension Massage: 2 d. petitgrain oil * 2 d. lavender oil * 2 d. sandalwood oil: in 20 ml carrier oil. Especially effective on the neck, shoulders, and temples.
 
Backache Massage: 2 d. eucalyptus oil * 2 d. lavender oil * 1 d. lemon oil: in 20 ml carrier oil. Focus on areas of tension with fingertips.
 
Bedtime Massage: 3 d. sandalwood oil * 2 d. chamomile oil: in 20 ml of carrier oil.
 
Calming Back Massage: 4 d. ylang ylang oil * 3 d. jasmine oil * 2 d. geranium oil: in 20 ml of carrier oil.
 
Circulation Improvement Massage: 6 d. lavender oil * 4 d. rosemary oil * 2 d. vetiver oil: in 4 oz. of sesame oil.
 
Face and Neck Massage: 2 d. galbanum oil * 3 d. neroli oil: in 20 ml carrier oil.
 
Hand Massage: 5 d. lime oil * 5 d. thyme oil * 5 d. eucalyptus oil * 5 d. cajeput oil: in 4 tablespoons carrier oil.
 
Leg Massage: 2 d. cypress oil * 2 d. lime oil * 1 d. lemon oil: in 20 ml carrier oil. Massage on calves, using gentle pressure on varicose veins.
 
Mature Ckin Massage: 2 d. myrrh oil * 2 d. lavender oil * 2 d. neroli oil: in 20 ml wheatgerm oil.
 
Pain-Relieving Massage: 3 d. pine oil * 3 d. eucalyptus oil * 3 d. frankincense oil: in 20 ml carrier oil. Especially effective on sore joints.
 
Relaxing Full-Body Massage: 3 d. neroli oil * 2 d jasmine oil: in 20 ml of carrier oil.
 
Relaxing Massage: 2 d. geranium oil * 2 d. rose oil * 2 d. lavender oil: in 20 ml carrier oil. Can be used effectively as a face and scalp massage. Relieves anxiety.
 
Sensual Body Massage: 2 d. patchouli oil * 3 d. geranium oil * 3 d. rose oil: in 20 ml carrier oil.
 
Stimulating Body Rub: 1 d. peppermint oil * 1 d. myrrh oil * 2 d. lavender oil: in 20 ml carrier oil. This is an excellent winter rub.
 
Summer Stimulating Massage: 2 d. lemongrass oil * 3 d. orange oil * 1 d. rosemary oil: in 20 ml carrier oil. Good for back and shoulder massages.
 
Uplifting Massage: 2 d. bergamot oil * 2 d. orange oil * 2 d. petitgrain oil: in 20 ml carrier oil. Good early-morning body rub.
 
Varicose Vein Massage: 2 d. lime oil * 2 d. cedarwood oil: in 20 ml carrier oil. Rub lightly, using only fingertips.
 
Wrinkled or Puffy Face Massage: 2 d. rose oil * 1 d. violet oil * 1 d. geranium oil: in 20 ml carrier oil. Rub lightly on face, using only fingertips.

MEDICINAL:
Aromatherapy can be used to treat minor pain, in conjunction with a doctor’s or homeopathist’s treatment. If you are experiencing severe physical pain, or discomfort of any kind, do not rely on aromatherapy alone to alleviate your symptoms. Visit a liscensed medical practicioner. As a general rule, do not to exceed ten drops of total essential oils per recipe, and try to keep it around five for maximum effectiveness. Please read all the warnings at the bottom before using.

Athlete’s Foot: 3 d. lavender oil * 2 d. tea tree oil: in 4 oz. of hot water. Soak foot in water for at least 15 minutes. Eucalyptus oil may be substituted for tea tree oil.
 
Bronchitis Bath: 6 d. eucalyptus oil * 2 d. hyssop oil * 2 d. sandalwood oil.
 
Bruises: 2 d. lavender oil * 2 d. fennel oil: in cold water. Wring out a cloth in the water and apply as a cold compress to affected area.
 
Cellulite: 5 d. fennel oil * 4 d. rosemary oil * 2 d. juniper oil * 4 d. lavender oil: in 20 ml of carrier oil. Massage into affected area.
 
Constipation Massage: 6 d. rosemary oil * 6 d. thyme oil: in 1 oz. olive or almond oil. Massage on abdomen in a clockwise circular motion.
 
Cough and Cold Treatment Bath: 3 d. tea tree oil * 2 d. lemon oil * 2 d. pine oil. Soak for at least 15 minutes in bathtub to relieve tightness and congestion.
 
Cramps Bath: 5 d. marjoram oil * 5 d. basil oil.
 
Cystitis Bath: 3 d. lavender oil * 3 d. sandalwood oil * 2 d. cedarwood oil.
 
Dermatitis Bath: 4 d. geranium oil * 2 d. juniper oil * 2 d. lavender oil.
 
Diarrhea Massage: 5 d. lavender oil * 5 d. patchouli oil * 5 d. cypress oil: in 20 ml of carrier oil. Massage onto abdomen in a clockwise motion.
 
Eczema Massage: 3 d. bergamot oil * 3 d. geranium oil * 6 d. juniper oil * 3 d. lavender oil: in 20 ml massage oil.
 
Fever Compress: 3 d. tea tree oil * 2 d. bergamot oil: in 4 oz of iced water. Wring out a piece of fabric in water, and apply to forehead or back of neck. Re-apply when it has warmed to body temperature.
 
Hangover Bath: 3 d. rosemary oil * 3 d. rosewood oil.
 
Hangover Compress: 1 d. peppermint oil * 1 d. rosewood oil * 1 d. lavender oil: on a cool, wet rag. Apply to temples for ten minutes.
 
Headache Inhalant: 1 d. rose oil * 1 d. basil oil * 1 d. orange oil * 1 d. rosemary oil.
 
Hemhorroids Bath: 5 d. cypress oil * 3 d. juniper oil * 3 d. frankincense oil.
 
Hives Massage: 4 d. chamomile oil * 4 d. melissa oil: in 20 ml carrier oil.
 
Hot All-Purpose Poultice: 5 d. cypress oil: in 4 oz. of hot water. Wring out a peice of fabric in the water. Apply to stomach for stomachache or period cramps.
 
Indigestion Massage: 4 d. peppermint oil * 4 d. marjoram oil * 4 d. coriander oil * 4 d. fennel oil * 4 d. basil oil: in 1 oz olive oil. Massage gently into stomach.
 
Inflammation-Reducing Compress: 3 d. clary sage oil * 2 d. geranium oil: in 4 oz. iced water. Wring out a piece of fabric in water, and apply to forehead or back of neck. Re-apply when it has warmed to body temperature.
 
Insect Bites: 1 tbsp. Aloe Vera * 5 d. chamomile oil. Apply to affected area until skin no longer itches.
 
Muscle Pain Poultice I: 3 d. ginger oil * 3 d. eucalyptus oil: in 600 ml hot water. Wring out a piece of fabric in water, and apply to forehead or back of neck. Re-apply when it has cooled to body temperature.
 
Muscle Pain Poultice II: 3 d. petitgrain oil * 2 d. eucalyptus oil: in 600 ml hot water. Wring out a piece of fabric in water, and apply to forehead or back of neck. Re-apply when it has cooled to body temperature. Good for period cramps.
 
Nausea Inhalant:1 d. lavender oil * 1 d. peppermint oil.
 
Puffy Eyes: 1 d. chamomile oil: on a cool, damp ball of cotton wool. Apply to closed eyes for ten minutes.
 
Period Cramp Poultice: 3 d. juniper oil * 2 d. clary sage oil: in 600 ml of hot water. Wring out a piece of fabric in water, and apply to forehead or back of neck. Re-apply when it has cooled to body temperature.
 
Pre-Menstrual Stress Massage Oil: 10 d. rose oil * 8 d. ylang ylang oil * 7 d. bergamot oil * 5 d. geranium oil: in 2 tablespoons of sesame oil. Rub gently onto abdomen, using more massage oil if needed (do not increase essential oil amounts).
 
Skin Rash Compress: 3 d. cedarwood oil * 2 d. lavender oil: in 600 ml iced water. Wring out a piece of fabric in water, and apply to forehead or back of neck. Re-apply when it has warmed to body temperature.
 
Sore Eyes: 1 d. fennel oil: on a cool, damp ball of cotton wool. Apply to closed eyes for ten minutes.
 
Sprained Ankle Massage: 5 d. chamomile oil * 5 d. peppermint oil * 5 d. cypress oil: in 3 tablespoons of carrier oil.
 
Sunburn Bath: 6 d. peppermint oil * 4 d. lavender oil.
 
Tired Eyes: 1 d. chamomile oil: on a cool, damp ball of cotton wool. Apply to closed eyes for ten minutes.
 
Urinary Tract Infection Bath: 10 d. eucalyptus oil * 10 d. sandalwood oil. Add to a lukewarm bath.
 
Varicose Vein Bath: 5 d. cypress oil * 5 d. geranium oil.

When used in moderation, essential oils can make very effective moisturizers that can relax or invigorate. Do not use these on broken or cut skin. As a general rule, do not to exceed ten drops of total essential oils per lotion, and try to keep it around five for maximum effectiveness. Please read all the warnings at the bottom before using.

MOISTURISERS:
Cellulite Rub: 2 d. bay oil * 2 d. lemon oil * 4 d. lavender oil: in 20 ml sesame oil.
 
Chapped Lips: 3 d. chamomile * 2 d. benzoin: in 1 teaspoon sesame oil.
 
Dull Complexion Moisturizer: 2 d. orange oil * 1 d. lemon oil * 1 d. lime oil: in 20 ml carrier oil. Good also for thread veins.
 
Oily Skin Moisturizer: 2 d. cedarwood oil * 1 d. juniper oil: in 20 ml carrier oil.
 
Rich Moisturizer: 3 d. myrrh oil * 2 d. rose oil: in 20 ml carrier oil.
 
Stretch Mark Treatment: 1 d. frankincense oil * 1 d. sandalwood oil * 2 d. lavender oil: in 20 ml carrier oil. Rub in lightly, using only fingertips.
 
Winter Weather Moisturizer: 2 d. patchouli oil * 2 d. sandalwood oil * 2 d. myrrh oil: in 20 ml carrier oil. Use almond oil for more sensitive skin, and sunflower oil for oily skin.

STEAM FACIALS:
To use essential oils in a steam facils, put the correct amounts of the essential oils you are using into a bowl, and add boiling water from a teakettle. Put your face near, but not in, the steam, cover your head and the bowl with a towel, and breathe ddeeply for a few minutes. As a general rule, do not to exceed ten drops of total essential oils per bowl, and try to keep it around five for maximum effectiveness. Please read all the warnings at the bottom before using.

Combination Skin Steam Facial: 3 d. lavender oil * 3 d. geranium oil * 2 d. lemon oil: in a bowl of hot water. Very helpful for oily skin; astringent.
 
Deep Moisturizing Steam Facial: 3 d. sandalwood oil * 2 d. rose oil: in a bowl of hot water. Good for normal and combination skin.
 
Depression and Anxiety Inhalant: 3 d. frankincense oil * 2 d. chamomile oil: in a bowl of hot water. Use with deep breathing.
 
Dry Skin Facial: 2 d. chamomile oil * 3 d. jasmine oil: in a bowl of hot water. Very moisturizing.
 
Mature Skin Steam Facial I: 2 d. neroli oil * 3 d. rose oil: in a bowl of hot water.
 
Mature Skin Steam Facial II: 3 d. galbanum oil * 2 d. frankincense oil: in a bowl of hot water. Deep cleaning.
 
Pre-Bedtime Steam Facial: 3 d. jasmine oil * 2 d. ylang ylang oil: in a bowl of hot water. Relaxing.

MISCELLANEOUS:
Essential oils can be used in so many different ways. In this section, I have included all the recipes which do not fit anywhere else. Room deoderizers are included here. As a general rule, do not to exceed ten drops of total essential oils per ointment, and try to keep it around five for maximum effectiveness. Please read all the warnings at the bottom before using.

Carpet Deoderizer: 35 d. eucalyptus oil * 30 d. lavender oil * 25 d. rosewood oil: in 4 cups of Borax. Mix well in a bowl. Sprinkle onto carpets and let sit for 10-15 minutes. Vacuum up.
 
Children’s Calming Mist: 10 d. allspice oil * 10 d. chamomile oil * 10 d. mandarin oil * 10 d. vetiver oil: in 4 oz. water. Mist into rooms where hyperactive children play.
 
Citrus Air Freshener: 20 d. orange oil * 10 d. lemon oil * 7 d. grapefruit oil * 5 d. cedarwood oil: in 4 oz. water.
 
Floral Air Freshener: 20 d. rose * 10 d. orange * 10 d. clove: in 4 oz of water
 
Guilt Reliever: 8 d. sandalwood oil * 8 d. neroli oil * 4 d. geranium oil: in 20 ml. of carrier oil. Use as a massage, paying special attention to the temples.
 
Insect Reppellant: 10 d. jojoba oil * 10 d. granium oil * 5 d. cedarwood oil * 5 d. sweet bay oil * 5 d. lime oil * 5 d. pine oil: in 2 oz. of vodka. Sprinkle around outside where insects are the most annoying.
 
Memory Lapses: If you find yourself the victim of frequent problems with your memory, use rosemary to counteract the problem. It works as a room spray, as an inhalant, or on a cold compress applied to the forehead and temples.
 
Mint Air Freshener: 5 d. peppermint oil * 5 d. spearmint oil * 2 d. peru balsam oil: in 4 oz. of water.
 
Pet’s Calming Mist: 5 d. lavender oil * 5 d. chamomile oil * 2 d. mandarin oil: in 4 oz. of water.
Scent For a Winter Fire: 4 d. ginger oil * 4 d. sandalwood oil * 4 d. orange oil. Sprinkle mixture onto logs 15 minutes before starting fire.
 
Working Spritz- Productive: 3 d. peppermint oil * 2 d. lemon oil * 2 d. juniper oil: in 1 oz of water.
 
Working Spritz- Focused: 3 d. basil oil * 3 d. rosemary oil * 2 d. lemon oil: in 1 oz of water.
 
Working Spritz- Stress Free: 4 d. geranium oil * 4 d. lavender oil: in 1 oz of water.
 
Working Spritz- Clear Thinking: 3 d. rosemary oil * 3 d. lemon oil * 3 d. basil oil: in 1 oz of water.

WARNING! WARNING! WARNING! WARNING! WARNING! These ARE toxic essential oils, far too strong for use by the hobbyist. General aromatherapy use of these oils may result in kidney and/or liver failure. When these oils enter your system, the breakdown which occurs creates toxic molecules which bind to the cells of the liver and kidneys, destroying them. This is serious, and too scary! Pharmaceutical companies may know how to use these oils to control certain human body functions, but I recommend that anyone else STAY AWAY: Horseradish, Jaborandi, Narcissus, Parsley, Santolina, Rue, Tansy, Tonka Bean, Wormwood. (Synthetic fragrance oils, such as narcissus, don’t actually contain any narcissus and probably won’t hurt you, unless you have allergies.)

Planet Hollywood’s Captain Crunch Chicken

Serving Size : 1
Categories :Chicken
INGREDIENTS:
2cups Captain Crunch Cereal, crush
1 1/2cupsCornflakes, crush
1Egg, 1cupMilk, 1cupAll purpose flour
1teaspoon Onion powder, 1teaspoonGarlic powder
1/2 teaspoon Black pepper,
2 pounds Chicken breast; skin, bone1oz tenders
Vegetable oil for frying
*********
Preparation Instructions: Beat the egg with milk and set aside. Stir together the flour, onion and garlic powders and black pepper. Set this aside also. Dip the chicken pieces into the seasoned flour. Move around to coat well, then shake off the excess flour. Dip into the egg wash, coating well, then dip into the cereal mixture, coating well. Heat oil in a large heavy skillet to 325~. Drop coated chicken tenders carefully into the hot oil and cook until golden brown and fully cooked, 3 to 5 minutes depending on size. Drain and serve immediately with Creole mustard sauce.

Calisaya

Botanical: Cinchona calisaya (WEDD.)
Family: N.O. Rubiaceae
—Synonyms—Jesuit’s Powder. Yellow Cinchona.
—Part Used—Bark.
—Habitat—Tropical valleys of the Andes. Bolivia and Southern Peru.

——————————————————————————–
—Description—Cinchona is an important genus and comprises a large number of evergreen trees and shrubs, flowers white and pinkish arranged in panicles, very fragrant. Not all the species yield cinchona or Peruvian bark. The most important is called Calisaya or yellow bark. Its great value as a tonic and febrifuge depends on an alkaloid, quina (Quinine). This substance chiefly exists in the cellular tissue outside the liber in combination with kinic and tannic acids. Calisaya yields the largest amount of this alkaloid of any of the species – often 70 to 80 per cent of the total alkaloids contained in the bark which is not collected from trees growing wild, but from those cultivated in plantations. The bark for commerce is classified under two headings: the druggist’s bark, and the manufacturer’s at a low price. The great bulk of the trade is in Amsterdam, and the bark sold there mainly comes from Java. That sold in London from India, Ceylon and South America. Mature Calisaya bark has a scaly appearance, which denotes maturity and high quality. It is very bitter, astringent and odourless.
—Constituents—The bark should yield between 5 and 6 per cent of total alkaloids, of which not less than half should consist of quinine and cinchonidin. Other constituents are cinchonine, quinidine, hydrocinchonidine, quinamine, homokinchonidine, hydroquinine; quinic and cinchotannic acids, a bitter amorphous glucocide, starch and calcium-oxalate.

—Medicinal Action and Uses—See PERUVIAN BARK.

—Preparations and Dosages—Decoction of Cinchona, B.P., 1/2 to 2 fluid ounces. Elixir of Cinchona or Elixir of Calisaya, B.P.C., 1/2 to 1 fluid drachm. Tincture of Cinchona, B.P.C., 1/2 to 1 fluid drachm. Cinchona wine, B.P.C., 1/2 to 1 fluid ounce.

Tanat

 
Themes: Unity, joy & luck
Symbols: Flowers & triangle
 
About Tanat: In Cornwall, Tanat is the mother Goddess of fertility who
has given all Her attention to nursing Spring into its fullness. She
also staunchly protects Her children ( nature and people ) so that our
spirits can come to know similar fulfillment.
 
To Do Today: The Furry Dance is an ancient festival that rejoices in
Tanat’s fine work manifested in Spring’s warmth and beauty. To bring
this goddess’s lucky energy into your life, it’s customary to dance with
a partner. In fact, the more people you can get dancing, the more
fortunate the energy! Usually this is done on the streets throughout a
town as a show of regional unity, but when propriety won’t allow such a
display, just dance around a room together instead.  Don’t worry about
the steps–just do what feels right.
 
Wearing something with floral or triangular motifs ( guys, wear a
necktie, and gals, pull out a square scarf and fold it in half crosswise
) activates Tanat’s happiness in your life and in any region where you
have the token on today. As you don the item, say,
 
“Liberate happiness in and around,
by Tanat’s blossoming power, joy will be found!”
 
Or, if you want to use the same thing to generate unity and harmony, use
this incantation:
 
“Harmony and unity,
Tanat’s blessings come to me!”

from 365 Goddess – A Daily Guide of the Magick and Inspiration of the
Goddess
by Patricia Telesco

Goddess Meditation

My mother, she was from a good clan.
The Earth of her clan was good Earth.
The Earth of her clan bore good crops.
My mother’s Earth bore good wheat.
She moved it, she threshed it,
and she gathered its grain from the floor.
~ Greek Folksong
 
In many cultures, the mother of the family is honoured as a leader of
the clan or the nation. This reverence is shown in various ways.
Sometimes her children bear her name; in other cases the family wealth
belongs to her. In some cultures, primary decisions are made by the clan
mothers or grandmothers. Even the decision about whether or not to go to
war rests in women’s hands, for it is understood that women – out of
concern for the future of their children – will be careful and will make
wise decisions.
 
In our own world today, motherhood is rarely sufficiently honoured. One
day each year, there are brunches and corsages and little gifts of love.
But the rest of the time? As a culture, we do not respect the great gift
of mothering. Women’s work in raising the next generation is taken for
granted. Yet it is a vital service to humanity, one that deserves to be
acknowledged continually.

from The Goddess Companion – Daily Meditations on the Feminine Spirit
by Patricia Monaghan

Morning Prayer to The Elements

Air to inspire,
Fire to bring desire,
Water as my healer,
Earth as my church.
I call upon you
To bless this day anew.
So mote it be.

High Awareness Bath

3 parts Cedarwood Oil
2 parts Sandalwood Oil
1 part Farnkincense Oil
Color: Purple
Bathe in this mixture to direct your consciousness toward higher things, to pormote spirituality and to combat Earth-obsessions such as uncontrolled spending, overeating, sluggishness and all forms of unbalanced materialism.

Make a Silver Branch

© 1995 by D. J. Conway

Some folks who do not care for the sound of the drum prefer to use the musical Silver Branch instead. Similar to the rattle used in other shamanic cultures, the Silver Branch is used as a guide on the journey to the Otherworlds. King Cormac of Ireland received a Silver Branch from an Otherworld stranger and used it to heal his people. As a link between the outer and inner realms, the Silver Branch is a source of inspiration and authority.

To make your own Silver Branch, first select a tree branch 12-16 inches long. Try to get one that has fallen naturally, or use a length of dowel instead. Strip it of bark. If the branch is too smooth, you will want to cut some grooves in the surface so that the bells will not slide off. Once it is ready, paint the branch with silver paint.

For the golden bells, choose 3 bells with a clear, pleasing tone and tie them to the branch, once it has dried.

In legend these bells were called chiming fruit. Three is usually given as the numbers of apples or other items that adorned the Silver Branch. Three was an important number to the Celts in both Ireland and Wales. The Celtic clans held the Triple Goddess in high esteem; the Druids believed in the three rays of Light that created and renewed; Gwion Bach drank three drops from Cerridwen s cauldron.

In Celtic lore the Silver Branch was always given to a mortal by a being from the Otherworld. It became fee emblem of the PoetBards of Ireland and Wales.

Seed Moon

At the Seed Moon plant your seeds of magick, whether it be in a garden, in a pot by the window or simply in your heart. Fill your home with light and flowers, create colorful eggs to decorate it and bring fertility and joy. On the full Moon plant herbs. Sing in the rain..

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